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Important Things To See In Beacon Hill

Beacon Hill is a prominent attraction for tourists visiting Boston. The Greek Revival architecture, Cobblestone Streets, Boston Commons and the Public Garden are all located within a walking distance and nobody wants to miss out on these attractions. But a complete tour of the Beacon Hill area could easily take up a whole day.
To avoid that, here’s a guide of all the major destinations you need to see and this is totally doable in two hours.

 

1.) Massachusetts State House

Completed in mid 1798, the State House was composed by Charles Bulfinch, the star architect of his day and a pioneer in the Federal style. The wood shingles that initially contained its vault in the end offered a copper and a 23K gold covering.

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2.) Nichols House Museum

Very close to the State House is this exhibition hall housed in a 1804 Federal townhouse designed by Charles Bulfinch. The historical center, named for the townhouse’s last proprietor, who passed on in 1960 and handed down it, portrays life in Beacon Hill in the nineteenth and mid twentieth hundreds of years.

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3.) Th Robert Gould Shaw and Massachusetts 54th Regiment Memorial

This landmark to the African-American regiment to serve in the U.S. Armed force, is right crosswise over Beacon St. from the State House. It took the great sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens about 14 years to finish it. It was finally completed in 1897.

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4.) Louisburg Square

Out of the Common and up to Louisburg Square! It is so Beacon Hill in the Greek Revival and Federal design. There is also a little park there that is once in a while open to the public.

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5.) Boston Common

The most established public park in America, the Common follows its roots to 1634. Inside its 50 acres of land live a collection of attractions, including the Frog Pond and a merry go round too. In fact having a place with all of Boston, the recreational park appears as an unmistakable component of Beacon Hill, which seeps into the neighboring Public Garden.

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